With the new season here at Haenke, we’re bringing you some freshly collected news and botanical inspiration from the world of nature and urban greenery. Read below if you want to know how plants’ defense mechanism works (it’s pretty ruthless let me tell you), what’s in store for Space10, the innovation lab for IKEA, or the latest adventures of our fave Instragram traveller duo Haarkon.

ARCHITECTURE

  Photo courtesy: MAD Architects

Photo courtesy: MAD Architects

Future living according to MAD Architects

If your life-long dream is living in nature with all the comfort of a cosy home, well, maybe MAD Architects may have a solution for you. Their recent proposal for the house of future presented at this year’s China House Vision aims to break the boundaries between the outside and the inside space, offering, instead of the traditional concept of a house, a liveable space covered by a state-of-art roof that vanishes into its surroundings. Created out of transparent and waterproof glass that protects its inhabitants from rain, it also provides natural ventilation system as well as plenty of sunlight. In addition to that, it hosts solar panels which make the house entirely self-sufficient and environmentally sustainable. Go see designboom for more info.

DESIGN

  Visuals : Space10

Visuals : Space10

Farm on the go? IKEA develops basic services on the wheels

If phrases “time well spent” and “traffic jam” seem like an oxymoron, then listen up. In a few year’s time, you may change your opinion thanks to a project by Space10, IKEA’s innovation lab focused on sustainable and useful design. Using potential of autonomous cars, the project offers seven futuristic proposals of car design that champion user comfort as well as extending the current concept of travel. While transporting yourself from point A to point B in the future, you will be able to enjoy services such as café, hotel, office or farm - all this available within minutes thanks to a simple app. Imagine you suddenly feel like you’d want a bunch of strawberries from your local farmer: call your farm on the go and get your berries instantly in a few minutes’ time. Other options sound even more attractive: why not to work in a mobile café or office on your way to your actual office (that is attractive… rrright?) - without even realising there’s a horrible traffic jam going on right in front of you.

ARTS

  Photography: Toshio Shibata

Photography: Toshio Shibata

Treescapes, a hypnotic landscape as seen by two Japanese photographers

Juxtaposing two different viewpoints on nature is this current exhibition called Treescapes, hosted at New York’s Laurence Miller Gallery. Discover stunning photographs of Japanese photographers Yoko Ikeda and Toshio Shibata offering hypnotic visualisations of their native Japan’s countryside. While Shibata balances between photography and painting, Ikeda plays with contrasts between nature and human life. Upon his return to Japan, Shibata decided to look for beauty in places often overlooked by other photographers - in non-photogenic structures. However, he never looks for them on purpose, and doesn’t particularly challenge its historical nor political context which makes his art neutral. Yoko Ikeda, on the contrary, excels in grasping the everyday and the mundane in her art, to which she adds a pinch of extraordinary by making the screen 2D effect.

SCIENCE

Plants increasingly resemble animals in their defense system

Maybe you still think that plants are powerless and passive organisms that best work in our interior or inside our stomach. Well, you should read this new study published recently in the Science magazine which dramatically roots out this skeptical thesis. Plants, according to the study, are very similar to animals in their way of defense against external dangers. When plants are hurt, they send a signal from the injured part that cuts through its entire nervous system. This “alarm” lasts for 120 second, producing chemicals needed to repair immediately. Scary to watch!

LITERATURE

  Photography: Haarkon, haarkon.co.uk

Photography: Haarkon, haarkon.co.uk

Haarkon, from Instagram to print

What would be a better way to end our botanical news than with what essential reading you need to fill your rainy autumn evenings. If you love greenhouses and botanical gardens, you definitely shouldn’t miss this new publication called Glasshouse Greenhouse written by India Hobson and Magnus Edmondson of the duo Haarkon, who basically made flaneuring in botanical gardens and observing shadowplay an Instagram cult. Pre-order their bible of greenery here. And we’re not talking if you don’t follow them already.